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Criminal Justice Program

The Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice program includes a core set of general education courses, specialized criminal justice courses plus electives. Developed by academic and industry professionals, the curriculum focuses on real-world skills.

A career in this field may require you to meet certain licensing, training, and other requirements that can vary by vocation and state. You should check with your state, local government and/or licensing board to find out which requirements may be applicable in your state. Click here for contact information on state licensing/regulatory boards and certain professional licensing information.

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Semester 1

EN110 - Achieving Academic Excellence 

This course will help students sharpen skills that will help in achieving maximum learning as they complete their degree programs. Taking this course will unlock students' undiscovered potential and will help them discover their multiple intelligences and best ways to learn. This course will also help students uncover strengths and build from them, as well as explore the areas where they might change behaviors to ensure college success.
Credit Hours: 3

SP180 - Principles of Public Speaking 

This course teaches the students fundamental principles while emphasizing skills development in the practice of public speaking. It covers purposes, methods and steps in preparing speeches, develops communication skills in listening, speech criticism, audience analysis and writing, and provides effective delivery techniques to present a variety of speeches.
Credit Hours: 3

EN120 - English Composition I  

This course offers an introduction to basic writing skills that is especially relevant to academic assignments. It focuses on paragraph development and organization in conjunction with a review of basic grammar and mechanics. The course also covers the construction of multi-paragraph essays, the development of writing style and tone, and techniques for critically editing and revising one's work.
Credit Hours: 3

C10 - Introduction to Computers  

Introduction to Computers provides students with foundational skills and knowledge needed for today's technology-based careers. Students learn the components of systems—from the CPU and memory to input devices and peripherals—and how these components interact with an operating system to perform critical tasks. Keeping current with fast-changing computer technologies, this course will discuss the computer technologies today that are allowing the creation of a virtualized mobile workforce. It will explore how computers connect to the Internet, what services can be found online, and what dangers exist in the form of viruses, Trojans, and other malware. The course will also familiarize the student with the basics of today's office productivity applications and help to establish a foundation for working with these different types of applications, including spreadsheets, word processors, and presentation-creation tools.
Credit Hours: 3

J01 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

This course is an introduction to the criminal justice process, including an overview of crime in America, criminal law, policing, the courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
Credit Hours: 3

Semester 2

EN130 - English Composition II  

This course provides an introduction and extensive guidelines for writing multi-paragraph essays in a college environment. In this way, EN130 will help you to better comprehend and assimilate the wide range of written communications that are vital to professional callings in commerce, industry, government, law enforcement, and healthcare—not to mention reports, documents, essays, and books associated with the universe of academic disciplines and the various areas of scientific research. For, as it turns out, the basics of the writing process apply to all forms of academic and professional communications.
Prerequisite for C02
Credit Hours: 3

General Education Elective (Science 100-200 Level)   J02 - Criminal Law  

This course discusses why we have criminal laws and begins to define the proof that is necessary to convict someone of a crime. Social issues that affect how and why laws are made are examined, as well as the behavior that is the subject of criminal law. Topics include criminal liability, criminal defenses and jurisdiction, crimes against persons and property, sex crimes, and other criminal conduct.
Credit Hours: 3

J03 - Criminal Procedure  

This course provides an overview of the procedures used to lawfully investigate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals suspected of and accused of violating criminal laws. It also explores the many facets of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the Constitution and how the Constitution protects us from an oppressive government while at the same time providing the means to catch and bring wrongdoers to justice.
Credit Hours: 3

J10 - Criminal Investigation  

This is a thorough examination of the investigation process and of situations in which police officers apply specific investigative and information-gathering techniques to meet the evidentiary requirements of specific crimes. Topics include how law enforcement deals with violent crime, criminal investigative procedures for kidnapping, extortion, and homicide, and the investigative techniques used to solve complex criminal cases, such as organized crime, white-collar crime, arson, and bombings.
Credit Hours: 3

Semester 3

General Education Elective (Behavioral/Social Science 100-200 Level)   General Education Elective (Humanities/Fine Arts 100-200 Level)   J06 - Ethics in Criminal Justice  

This course bridges the gap between the ideals of justice and the ethical behavior that criminal justice professionals should exhibit in the furtherance of justice. It also presents information that criminal justice professionals need to resolve many of the ethical dilemmas they may face, and to understand the dilemmas faced by others within the justice system.
Credit Hours: 3

J04 - Policing  

This course provides an introduction to the responsibilities of police officers, providing examples and applications of theory, including topics such as patrol techniques, use of discretion, and describing how police departments are organized and managed, and how they are responding to modern challenges.
Credit Hours: 3

J05 - Corrections  

This course provides a broad-based, foundational approach to understanding the many elements of America’s correctional system from the perspective of both the corrections worker and the criminal offender. Particular attention is paid to issues including alternative sanctions, incarceration of women and juveniles, and the effects of incarceration upon release.
Credit Hours: 3

Semester 4

C17 - College Mathematics or MA240 - College Algebra*  

C17: This is a comprehensive review of mathematical skills and concepts commonly used in academic and vocational applications. Topics include whole numbers, fractions, decimal notation, ratios and proportions, percents, statistics and measurement, geometry, real numbers, and algebra.
Credit Hours: 3

MA240: This course introduces the major concepts of college-level algebra. The course begins with basic concepts such as sets and numbers but quickly moves into intermediate algebra topics, emphasizing concepts most often used in computer science. The student will gain extensive experience in evaluating and manipulating expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions.
Credit Hours: 3

SO245 - Social Impact of Technology  

This course examines the broad implications of technological innovation on social organization in terms of personal, political, economic, and environmental issues. Topics covered include technological progress within society, issues of energy use and creation, positive and negative environmental impacts of technology, the use of technology in war and politics, social responsibility, personal health, and economic development.
Credit Hours: 3

J09 - Juvenile Justice  

This course examines the facts behind juvenile delinquency, the processes in the justice system affecting juvenile offenders, the roles of probation, institutionalization, parole, and delinquency prevention. The course also closely examines the robber, gang member, rapist, status offender, and the deprived child.
Credit Hours: 3

Elective (100-200 Level)  

View Elective (100-200 Level) offerings.

Elective (100-200 Level)  

View Elective (100-200 Level) offerings.

Semester 5

MA260 - Statistical Analysis I  

This is an introduction to the foundations of statistical analysis, including distributions, measures of location and dispersion, probability, the normal probability distribution, sampling and testing methods, and decision analysis.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ320 - American Constitutional Law  

This course examines the historical development and constitutional principles of American government including inquiries into federalism, national and state powers, separation of powers, checks and balances, due process, and equal protection of the laws. The primary focus will be on a study of the U.S. Constitution and the application of Constitutional law to modern-day court cases and situations.
Credit Hours: 3

J11 - Report Writing  

This is a hands-on course that examines various reports used by police officers and develops the writing skills needed for note taking, police reports, and warrants.
Credit Hours: 3

General Education Elective (300-400 Level)   Elective (100-200 Level)  

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Semester 6

CJ340 - Criminology  

This course is an inspection of classic theories and current developments in theory, research, and policy with regard to such issues as mass and serial murder, hate and occult crimes, drugs and crime, career criminality, terrorism, and new forms of organized and white-collar crime.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ350 - Judicial Process  

This is a study of the basic terms and historical trends that have impacted the judicial process. The roles of court officers, defense counsel, prosecutor, judge, clerks, and bailiffs are distinguished, rules of evidence and constitutional grants of authority relating to defendant, witnesses, jury, and prosecutorial grants of authority are compared, the court process and process of the criminal justice system is analyzed, and contemporary problems and issues in the judicial process are evaluated.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ380 - Probation and Parole  

This course presents an overview of the history and philosophical foundations of probation and parole in the United States. It examines probation as part of the judicial process, and parole as part of the prison/correctional system. Also discussed are the issues and problems relating to the presentence report, determinate versus indeterminate sentencing, the variety of roles of the probation and parole officer, and the legal decisions affecting probation and parole practice.
Credit Hours: 3

General Education Elective (300-400 Level)   Elective (100-200 Level)  

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Semester 7

CJ390 - Victimology  

This is a comprehensive examination of the historical importance of victim restitution and contemporary developments within this field of study. Students explore the role of victimology in today’s criminal justice system, investigate the consequences of victimization, and examine the various remedies now available for victims.
Credit Hours: 3

J08 - Domestic Violence  

This course presents a careful examination of crimes committed by a family member against another family member, offering practical applications of theory and dispelling myths about victims and offenders. Topics covered include global violence against women, child abuse, stalking, and homicide.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ410 - Leadership in Law Enforcement  

This course provides a review of contemporary concepts and practices for first line supervisors in law enforcement. Police administration is examined from several perspectives, including a systems perspective, a traditional, structural perspective, a human behavioral perspective, and a strategic management perspective. Character, motivation, teamwork, and conflict resolution are emphasized.
Credit Hours: 3

Elective (300-400 Level)  

View Elective (300-400 Level) offerings.

Elective (300-400 Level)  

View Elective (300-400 Level) offerings.

Semester 8

CJ450 - Private Security or T02 - Introduction to Terrorism  

CJ450 - Private Security An examination of private security from a historical and philosophical perspective. Topics include the evolution of private security; basic security goals and responsibilities; investigation; loss prevention through risk management; security systems in the industrial, retail, commercial, and institutional settings; and current challenges facing the security profession.
Credit Hours: 3

T02 - Introduction to Terrorism Weapons of mass destruction, emergency management, incident response procedures, chemical, biological, and nuclear incidents, mass casualty decontamination, and crime scene operations.
Credit Hours: 3

T04 - Aviation Security or T06 - Cyber Security  

T04 - Aviation Security The history of hijacking, using aircraft as missiles, the roots of terrorism, international counterterrorism efforts, airport screening equipment, cargo security, and foreign airport security.
Credit Hours: 3

T06 - Cyber Security A look at the law enforcement approach to computer crime, including computer forensics, legal and constitutional considerations in prosecuting computer crime, and techniques for seizing evidence and analyzing data relating to computer crime.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ400 - Ethics in the Justice System or CJ440 - White Collar Crime*  

CJ400 - Ethics in the Justice System This is an examination of a wide range of ethical issues in policing, the practice of law, sentencing, corrections, criminal justice research, and crime control policy. Course discussion includes the utilitarian and deontological approaches to criminal justice ethics, morality of the death penalty, privatization of corrections, and the myths that influence public opinion toward crime and crime control.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ440 - White Collar Crime* In this course, students will review the debate regarding the definition of white collar crime, examine the costs of white-collar and corporate crime to society, consider competing theories to explain white collar criminality, and explore the use of criminal sanctions to deter the misconduct of corporations.
Credit Hours: 3

Elective (300-400 Level)  

View Elective (300-400 Level) offerings.

Elective (300-400 Level)  

View Elective (300-400 Level) offerings.

*If students expect to complete a bachelor's degree, MA240 is required. Students must take an Ethics in Justice course to complete a bachelor's degree in criminal justice.

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Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program is designed for students who want to gain knowledge of the multidisciplinary components that comprise American criminal justice. This program provides a broad base of traditional liberal arts and science courses, as well as courses that examine the functional components of criminal justice such as American law and procedure, criminal investigation and practice, and correctional settings. The program is geared toward students interested in such areas as law, law enforcement, corrections, and security, whether the student is already in the field or preparing for a career in a criminal justice related area.

Program Objectives

After completing the Criminal Justice program, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the development of criminal law in the United States,including the elements of due process, rule of law, and the role of the Constitution in protecting rights.
  2. Describe the dynamics of courthouse justice,the court process and process of the criminal justice system, and the role of court staff in interfacing with the public.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the investigative process by providing a thorough overview of the fundamentals of criminal investigation and by showing its application to many major felonies.
  4. Discuss the changing roles and goals of corrections; the variety of ways society punishes people who break criminal laws; and the impact of our corrections policies.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of contemporary concepts and practices for first line supervisors in law enforcement, with an emphasis on character, motivation, teamwork, and conflict resolution.
  6. Identify and analyze the pertinent concepts and theories of law, ethical issues that arise, and the principles of legal reasoning.
  7. Demonstrate a foundation of computer and information systems knowledge,technical skills, and a basic understanding of computer applications.
  8. Demonstrate proficiency with English composition, including the ability to use appropriate style, grammar, and mechanics in writing assignments and to conduct academic research.
  9. Identify and apply fundamental math concepts for operations and problem solving, and apply basic statistical concepts and tools in order to correctly interpret the results of statistical analyses.
  10. Be prepared to enter Ashworth College’s Master of Science or MBA programs without any additional academic preparation.

Advance your career in our accredited online Criminal Justice program. Study on your terms. Call 1-800-957-5412 or enroll online now.